Saturday, June 17, 2017

My Ancestry DNA results are in, and the winner is....

....Europe.  Yes, I'm a very white mutt.

My long awaited Ancestry DNA results came back yesterday, and they say I have a "high probability" (99%) of being European. Specifically:




"Great Britain" is defined as England, Scotland, and Wales.

"Europe West" is defined as France, Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Lichtenstein.

"Ireland" is defined as Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.  (Looks like Scotland and Wales get 2 shout-outs.)

"Scandinavia" is defined as Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.

Those 4 lilly white "high probability" regions total 92%.

With "lower confidence", they suggest I might be 3% from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), 2% from Europe East (Poland, Austria, the Balkans, etc), 1% from Finland / NW Russia, and 1% from Italy / Greece.

I have a "very low probability" (less than 1%) of having ancestors from Africa, and 0% from Asia, South America, or anywhere else in the world.   They say I have 0% chance of being Native American, which surprises me greatly.

These are based on DNA matches that cover the past several thousand years.  Over the past few hundred years (all here in America) my ancestors are likely from 2 regions, both heavily settled by North / West Europeans:



 The most likely route to Texas would be through Tennessee, Arkansas, and on to here.  Many Revolutionary War veterans were given land grants in Tennessee.  Some moved on to Texas to seek adventure fighting in our War of Independence from Mexico in 1836, and later some eventually moved to Texas by the lure of Black Gold.  



   This group first arrived in America mainly through Virginia.




A second, less likely way I may have arrived here is via a more southern route...South Carolina and northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi.  (There was apparently a bit of romance going on with the Tennessee crew.)




This possible branch of the family tree hit our shores mainly through Virginia and the Carolina's.

There is much more Ancestry DNA info I have yet to digest, but this, in a nutshell, is ME!  Have you done any DNA research?  If so, where are you from?

This is REALLY COOL stuff to know.  :)

S



10 comments:

  1. I know of a brother and sister that both took the DNA test and had very different results...information that is causing much angst in their family. Sometimes there are places we should not go, and or I'm not sure how accurate these tests are, and how strictly they are controlled.

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    1. I was interested in this when I got my results because they are 99% English and I know we have Irish. I looked it up and found ( Sorry I can't remember the site, it may have been Ancestry!) that siblings can have differing results because the parents contribute different DNA to each child. I've always been quite different from both my sisters, when I was a child my family would say the mailman must be my father! so it made sense to me.

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  2. While they fudge and say "with high probability", it's unlikely I'll never know for sure. But I do believe this is reasonably accurate in my case. Point: My brother has done some genealogy and found we're related to some Duke or Baron or something like that in Scotland, and that we made it to Texas through a migration path through the upper south as described. Also, I have green eyes, which is fairly common with people of Celtic, Scottish, and Germanic heritage. And I've heard of a 19th Century relative of mine from Bristol, TX, and the story goes that the original settlers of that town named it after their old hometown...Bristol, England. Coincidence?

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  3. Through research I have found my Fathers line came from Scotland through Virginia and then stopped in South Carolina where the majority still are...except for a few like me who branched out.

    I'm afraid if I did my DNA profile it would come up Mutt also, could be equal percentages in all of the categories ha ha.

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    1. Cool Jimmy. Maybe our forefathers were on the same ship, or were neighbors back in 'ol Scotland. Stranger things have happened!

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  4. No, I haven't researched my ancestry so far. What I know I don't like.

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    1. Aren't you curious what might be in your past besides the obvious Portuguese?

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  5. Now I'm sitting here, waiting for my results (I spit in the tube two weeks ago; it should take another 6 - 8 weeks to get results). This is interesting stuff. Since German churches keep excellent records and Germans are/were quite settled and tended to stay mostly in the same place, I know my family's history a number of generations back and I'd be surprised to find anything out of the ordinary. However, my grandfather has mentioned a relative emigrating to the U.S. long ago. So I might have a second cousin somewhere here in the States...and I could possibly find out who and where. Now THAT would be cool!

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  6. If you'll look at one of the immigration maps you'll see I have a fairly substantial connection to Germany, and Bavaria in particular. I'm very excited to learn of my European roots!

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  7. I can't believe I never did a blog post about my ancestry results - AND I don't even remember where they are now. Sheesh.

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